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With O'Donnell Tuomey basking in glory off the back of their Royal Gold Medal for their work in British and Irish architecture, we were inspired to 'look up', and not just at the Georgian Architecture we know and love.

O'Donnell Tuomey are the first Irish recipients since Peter Rice, engineer, who was the second Irish recipient after Michael Scott, who designed Busarus, the designs of which were battled by the Catholic church. Today, it might be pigeon-filled, but the beauty still glimpses out from beyond the rattle of suitcases assembled within.

There's exquisite brutalist work too, although exquisite may be too frilly a word for it. There's plenty at UCD Belfield, the Civic Offices and the Central Bank.

Then, suburbia, which zine 2ha has given us a new appreciation for, has its own fine architecture that shouldn't be dismissed.

Who knows their face from their faschia? Kate, Michael, or Jack?

"T Rex on the loose? Ain't no thang." - Steve Doogan
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September 25 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
8pm - 12pm

how much
€10 / €12

club night
Numero Group Presentation Records

Since 2003 Rob Sevier and Ken Shipley have been responsible for unearthing some of the funkiest musical gems from the dustiest of crates all over the world. Their simple mission was to bring these under-heard hits to the masses, music that might otherwise be lost forever to a dark library basement, only to be heard by the fortunate few. Their Eccentric Soul series mined the vaults of some of the less prosperous soul labels from across the States in the 60s including Miami’s Deep City and Chicago’s Twinight label. Stars like Syl Johnson have enjoyed a second coming as a result with his entire back catalogue being released as a box set. The evening will include a screening of Chicago Dance Party followed by an informal Q&A session with Rob and Ken before they jump behind the decks to spin some of their ultra-rare 45s. / Dave Desmond

 

September 25 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
7pm

how much
€10.20

screening
We Are Many

When Ireland first declared as a neutral state, it was ridiculed as a cop-out. But watching We Are Many, and living vicariously through the people in Britain who strove to make their voices heard against the war in Iraq, gives you a fresh appreciation for a military who are exclusively interested in peacekeeping missions, rather than war-mongering. This film is both macro and micro in its outlook, looking at the local and the international, and interviewing personalities as varied as Richard Branson, Damon Albarn, and Noam Chomsky. From the personal to the political, this film is a thought-provoking eye on the Iraq war, the black humour of its spin-off wars, and the universal effects of it. / Kate Coleman

 

September 25 2014


where
Bello Bar, 1 Portobello Harbour, Dublin 8.


when
7pm

how much
€10

gig
Lust For Youth

Lust for Youth sound like a post-punk band that never was. With a sound that borrows in equal parts from New Order’s mid 80’s output (Think Bizarre love Triangle) and Bauhaus’ dead pan vocal delivery, Lust for Youth explore the avenues that 80’s synth pop and post punk skipped entirely. Touring their third record on Tri Angle records, the band have recruited long time collaborator Loke Rahbek on guitar. The result is much more rounded, retaining the groups honest performance but creating a much more coherent and danceable body of work. Cold, swathed in reverb and icy guitar melodies, the songs are driven by thick kick drums and synth sounds of a bygone era. Think the moodier parts of New Order and the early non rubbish parts of Depeche Mode. Support comes from Cork noise artist Elll. Linking Andy Stotts pitched down suffocating walls of samples with down tempo beats; Elll’s music is subtle yet powerful. / Jack Broughan

 

September 25 2014


where
Newman University Church, 87a St. Stephen's Green, Dublin 2.

when
7:30pm

how much
€5-€20

concert
Oh Bohemia

Bohemian rhapsody anyone? No, I'm not talking about Freddie Mercury and his flamboyant hirsute friends. ’Oh Bohemia' is the intriguing title of the Irish Baroque Orchestra's first concert of the new season. Bohemia, now seen in historical terms, occupied much of what we now know as the Czech Republic. The eighteenth century Enlightenment brought much much in the way of music to Bohemia. The IBO’S unusual programme, under the direction of noted baroque violinist Monica Huggett, features rarely performed music by Mysliveček; Benda; Zelenka and Vanhal. These performances will feature some of the finest young musicians on the early music scene, including the very accomplished Jeroen Billiet on natural horn. He is lauded in his native Belgium and only last month was invited as a featured artist to the International Horn Symposium in London. / Des FitzGerald

 

September 25 2014


where
IMMA, Military Road, Dublin
01 6129900
Location Map

when
Until 12 October

how much
Free

exhibition
Jonathan Monk : The Project Spaces

Jonathan Monks’ work seeks to reinterpret the now tainted ideas of conceptualism with wry humour and repetition. All the possible combinations of eight legs kicking is the most dominant piece in the exhibition. Rather than being something cold and industrial, it's hard not to draw a smile looking at the piece. The legs move in an ever-changing sequence, reminding us of the passage of time. However the piece looks more like the movements of cancan dancers rather than a hardnosed conceptual piece. Monk’s wry humour is also present in A possible version of Minimal Art: The movie. Picturing Sean Connery and Frank Sinatra warbling about art after too much scotch while ridiculous, cuts to the heart of Monk’s work. It’s self aware, funny and blows the cobwebs off ideas of conceptual art in the post-YBA landscape. / Jack Broughan

   
 

September 26 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
See HERE

how much
See HERE

cinema
Maps To The Stars

Maps To The Stars does exactly what it says on the tin. Cronenberg operates on the Hollywood monster and injects every bit of creepy absurdity that is justifiably possible. Julianne Moore's turn as a Lindsay Lohan-esque, frazzled has-been is delicious, while the depictions of Beiber-like teen-idol monsters and Dogmatic Oprah Gurus are spot-on. The psycho-sexual thriller is well tempered with a rendering of a wonderfully meta and self-aware LA setting. With moments and threads of eeriness coming off as somewhat contrived compared to his other work, this could almost be seen as Cronenberg's missed opportunity for realism, a head-on tackling of a world which is already perfectly horrifying in its own right. That being said, I left the cinema entirely irked and satisfied. / Jack Gibson

 

September 26 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
4:30pm

how much
€7.60 - €9

cinema
Ida

In Ida, a novice nun on the cusp of taking her vows discovers that she is not who she thinks she is. Orphaned as a child, her true identity has never been made known to her until she discovers that she is the daughter of two Jews slaughtered during the Holocaust. Following this revelation, she makes contact with her last living relative, a world-weary aunt named Wanda, whom she accompanies on a road trip to find her parents' final resting place. What ensues is a coming-of-age tale that explores not only Ida's loss of innocence and first exposure to "the real world", but also one that casts a look at a Polish society haunted by the spectres of World War Two. Exquisitely framed and masterfully told, Ida is an elegant, nuanced drama that deserves to be seen. Simply put, it's a wonder. / Amy O'Connor

 

September 26 2014


where
Block T, 1-6 Haymarket, Smithfield Square
Location Map

when
8:30pm

how much
€15, BYOB

gig
Minimum Maximum

With the loss of Monster Truck, we thought we'd also buried Minimum Maximum, but no, like Lazurus, it has regenerated in a fresh form at Block T. This time, there is a secret line-up, which considering curator Nialler9's record (with his recent No Advance night attracting Fight Like Apes, White Collar Boy and Bantum) is the least dangerous bet you could place this weekend. Consider it a two-horse race between Red Rum and a donkey. You can't lose. We have pressed him for hints, but all he had to say was "please stop camping outside my house. I can see the FisherPrice baby monitor you've tried to drop down the chimney." Well, never let it be said we're not the Donal MacIntyres of cultural journalism. Take it to the Max. / Kate Coleman

   
 

September 27 2014


where
Button Factory, Curved Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 670 9202
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€13

gig
Girl Band

Girl Band got sick of making riffs a couple of years back, and are all the better for it. They plough their own shouty, droney furrow making a big racket one minute, plunging us down the K-hole the next. Lyrics are equally out there, when you can catch them…'I used to be good-looking'. Current single De Bom Bom sounds like an unprovoked assault in a sealed room. We're hearing a little Butthole Surfers, some Birthday Party, Jesus Lizard, The Stooges, and… Daft Punk? That's right, you can dance to this shit. Now that the Guardian are raving about them and Domino have signed them to a publishing deal it looks like the world is catching up to the Girls. Get a ticket for Saturday and pretend you got in at the ground floor. / Mr & Mrs Stevens

 

September 27 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
5pm

how much
€10.20

documentary
Bloody Good Headline

The temptation is easy. Ah the lovely Evening Herald street sellers. The upkeep of a tradition. The comforting sight in rush hour. Sure you'd be tempted to have a Toblerone too. Areaman, who've captured unique facets of Dublin life in titles such The Liberties, return with this 'Reality Bites' short. It's sobering. It's 2014 and it's now called The Herald. The sellers are mostly newly arrived non-nationals. Most car windows roll up at their sight. These people are on the lowest of rungs. While sub-editors crank out another 'Gangster Freddie' headline in the hope of shocking folk into a purchase, there's as much appeal as that of a shoeshine boy in the corner. One seller sums it up "Please buy this damn paper. I've had enough, please. I have a bloody good headline" It's refreshing to see the bite in this reality. (part of documentary shorts) / Michael McDermott

 

September 27 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:15pm

how much
€10.20

screening
Love is All

Cinema is an historical source that gives and gives. Whether you are looking at fashion, gender roles, politics, or any other facet of the world we live in, it is an easily accessed window into our past, our present, and our shared hopes for the future. Love is All examines all of the tender milestones of any romance, whether fleeting or forever. First kisses, and the painful flirting that preludes it, the promises and devotions that are expressed through ritual, moving in, getting married, having 2.4 children. The growing liberalism in our society is reflected, the communes of the sixties, the love that dare not speak its name stepping out of the dark, all the while scored by the Sheffield troubadour, Richard Hawley. This is a swelling masterpiece of anthropology through film, and it would break my heart if you missed it. / Kate Coleman

 

September 27 2014


where
Garden of Remembrance, Parnell Square East Dublin, Ireland
Location Map

when
2pm

how much
Free

peaceful protest
3rd Annual March for Choice

Self-determination is pretty cool. Taking responsibility is too. In a week where Emma Watson was threatened with nude pic leaks (as if she's been sending tit-pics, like, really) after she made a rousing speech in defence of feminism, by launching the HeForShe iniative, it's time for men and women to assemble and protest Ireland's abortion legislation. Last month, you could saunter into the IFI and watch Obvious Child, a gentle black comedy about abortion, but the reality for a woman here who has an unwanted pregnancy, or worse, an in-viable pregnancy, is taking the boat. This isn't to do with religion, creed, morals, or anything like that. It's to do with choice, freedom, and making responsible decisions for the right reasons, and not because the state doesn't trust you. / Kate Coleman

 

September 27 2014


where
Dublin Castle, 2 Palace Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
5pm

how much
Free, booking essential


Women at War

Irish women and the Great War is a subject even more glossed over than Irish men and the Great War. The role of women in war was traditionally to emasculate those who resisted the call of king and country, but during the great war, as it became clear that England's difficulty was Ireland's opportunity, the battle on the front took on a more divisive character. Coinciding with the centenary of the foundation of Cumann na mBan, History Ireland editor Tommy Graham and a panel of historians, John Borgonovo (UCC), Fionnuala Walsh (TCD), Liz Gillis (Kilmainham Jail) and Mary McAuliffe (UCD Women’s Studies), will discuss feminism, propaganda, and the divisons and unions which defined this epoch in history for Irish women. / Kate Coleman

 

September 27 2014


where
Whelan's Upstairs, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
Midnight

how much
€10

dance
Plutonic Dust

It's around 2am, it's Sunday night and there's still some petrol in the Electric Picnic tank. Midst the rolling party that is the Body & Soul zone comes this unknown act. Plutonic Dust aced it. Stopped in my tracks yet never rooted to one spot, this Dublin trio of Veronica Moran, Paddy MacAdam and Kevin McKnight brought the fun with their fusion of house, funk and electro pop. There's touches of Moloko (Triangulate) and the Chromatics (Losing Control) among many other master purveyors of pristine disco. Yes, of course, I should have been listening to Nialler9 when he said there were ones to catch at Hard Working Class Heroes last year but still...it feels like they're really going to fly high soon. / Michael McDermott

   
 

September 28 2014


where
Irish Film Institute, 6 Eustace St, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
01 679 3477
Location Map

when
6:30pm

how much
€10.20

screening
Ai Wei Wei : The Fake Case

Danish Director Andreas Johnsen follows Weiwei throughout his year of probation by the Chinese government for an alleged charge of tax avoidance. Throughout his house arrest Weiwei is seen preparing for S.A.C.R.E.D, a massive sculptural project consisting of six boxes all depicting realistic sculptures of his incarceration.

The film is intimate and gripping as Weiwei is harassed. We witness his phones being tapped, movements monitored, and surveillance teams photographing him. Although Weiwei is confined to his home, his tenure is certainly not comfortable. His plight and criticism attracts a groundswell of support from Chinese youth. Depicting Weiwei at his most vulnerable the film is both empowering and gripping, serving to depict and help overcome China’s attempt at stifling one of its leading artists. / Jack Broughan
 

September 28 2014


where
MARTCADE, 46 Rathmines Road Lower, Rathmines, Dublin, Ireland
Location Map

when
6pm

how much
€10 - €200

workshop
The MART Academy

While MART as a collective has been about since 2006, their physical presence in Dublin is still relatively new. With their first studios in the old fire station only opening, last year, their empire has quickly grown, encompassing 3 different buildings, a multitude of studios, exhibition spaces, a market, cafe and performance venue and now MARTcademy, a one stop shop for budding, developing and established artists. Covering a wide range of artistic and creative disciplines, there’s everything from an intro to turkish art to singing for the terrified. And they’re such sweeties, they even promise tea and cake for participants (let’s be honest, that’s what we all want!)So try something new this autumn, and head towards Rathmines for a little MARTucation! / Beccy Fitzpatrick

 

September 28 2014


where
The Workman's Club, 10 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2.
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€16

gig
Allah-Las

Is it possible for music to be sunny yet sad? Yes, yes it is. Listening to the Allah-Las you can imagine them lounging around (in the sun), lamenting life whilst smoking a heap of fags and cradling instruments with their suitably dishevelled locks framing there suitably attractive faces. Don't get me wrong there's nothing wrong with being moody - especially when it comes to music so soothing and easy listening as the Allah-Las. LA natives and music aficionados, these guys sound like they've been around for a lot longer than they have (check out there 2008 debut Catamaran). If you've been out since Friday this gig will be the perfect way to ease gently into a new week, and if your fresh you'll be just as easily seduced. / Niamh Keenan

   
 

September 29 2014


where
57 The Headline Bar, Clanbrassil Street, Dublin 8.

when
6:30pm

how much
3 courses, €33

food
#brewsweplate

Craft beer is currently de rigeur, and while we are sure that is in no small part due to our mass hallucination that Dublin is in fact a borough of New York, and the graphic design on the labels, it definitely has more to do with the fact that it is a pairing alternative to wine - which is where #brewsweplate comes into play. Popping up in one of our favourite Dublin 8 haunts, The Headline Bar (what can we say, we love a pint and a cheeseboard), the menu is nothing short of delectable, with dishes prepared to bring the best out of Five Lamps' Honor Bright Red Ale, The Tenters Brown Ale, and Blackpitts Porter. This is the antidote to your binge-drinking past, a sauntering meander of hoppy flavours. It'll be #brewsweate at #brewsweplate. / Kate Coleman

 

September 29 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€7.50 - €9.00

cinema
Cinema Book Club: Lolita

How did they ever make a movie of Lolita? Pop your critics hat on and chew on that pen quizzically and ask the question, did they really? A book so famed for it’s exquisite use of language almost clouding the ultra inappropriate romantic storyline, it’s delicate translation into a film was rightly put into the hands of cinematic genius, Stanley Kubrick. However, the director famously commented afterwards that he would never have taken on the project had he realised the extent of the censorship laws. As a read, Lolita cascades a litany of humour, wit and the eerie sense of an unreliable narrator throughout. Notwithstanding scenes which could not be shown due to censorship, the visual mode of cinema may perhaps never be able to convey the uncomfortable sensuality of such a great book. Now for you to decide. / Ciara Roche

 

September 30 2014


where
The Sugar Club, Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2
01 678 7188
Location Map

when
7:30pm

how much
€8

screening
Dirty Dancing

There are some movies that just stick with you, some movies that when they come on the idiot box you shiftily close the curtains, turn down the volume and not answer the phone in case the caller overhears someone talking about not putting ‘baby in the corner’. There are some movies that make you wish you were there while still reminding you at every turn that these are people you would not want to spend any length of time with. Some of these movies are bad, but some manage to hit the right notes all the way through and end up rather good. Some movies make you turn the volume up again halfway through in a devil-may-care fashion and make you ponder the fashion virtues of leather pants. Some movies just work. Don’t overthink it; just do the Dirty Dancing Mambo. / Hugh Torpey

   
 

October 01 2014


where
Light House Cinema , Smithfield Market, Dublin 7
Location Map

when
7:15pm

how much
€15

screening
Stephen Fry - More Fool Me

A stiff upper lip, tea and crumpets, Big Ben - these are just some iconic associations which spring to mind when conjuring images of our nearest neighbour. But when we consider an individual who personifies the rather pleasant spirit of Old Blighty few come closer than Stephen Fry. In the establishment but not of it, Fry simultaneously embodies the niceties of a nation yet avoids the insipidness so often required to win over its masses. Wit, raconteur and formidable Tweeter, his intellect has interrogated homophobia, tackled Monotheism and championed mental health awareness - “merely” nixers when factoring in his comedy output. This one man show beamed live from London documents Fry’s rather Wildean approach to life in late 80s and early 90s to celebrate a new volume of memoirs. Bertie Wooster would certainly not approve. / Aaron Purcell

 

October 01 2014


where
Whelan's, 25 Wexford Street, Dublin 2
Location Map

when
8pm

how much
€12

performance
Jozef Van Wissem : Only Lovers Left Alive

First things first, Jozef is a Dutch lutenist. Not since Vermeer committed Woman with a Lute to canvas around 1662 has the instrument been more attractive in the hands of someone. Van Wissem is also a composer most recently known for providing the score to Only Lovers Left Alive, Jim Jarmusch's acclaimed offbeat take on the vampire genre. Describing their collaboration, Van Wissem notes: "Jim's film is anti-contemporary-society. And the lute goes against all technology and against all computers and against all the shit you need". Van Wissem will be in conversation with Dan Gray whilst performing some of the soundtrack. And if you grab a photo with Van Wissem you might be able to also pass it off as a Dave Grohl moment to some grim friend. Win Tickets / Zach Joyce

 
What an Ensemble!

Le Cool listened to Rob Farhat and Rob Kearns of Ensemble muse on the music biz

Both myself and Rob come from a classical music background but were put off by the classical music attitude. The formal elitist kind, looking down their nose at other types of music thing. 

We want to make music projects that would normally not be commercially viable. So be it on the pop side, artists that don’t generally get picked up by good managers or labels in Ireland. Then on the classical side or jazz side, there’s stuff that depends on funding to be sustainable. We think we could market and manage that music that usually wouldn’t be given opportunities, better and across the whole spectrum. 

The core of our labels sound is based in contemporary classical so we are reinterpreting how those shows are done and perceived. Our issue with classical music in particular is how it’s presented. It’s very stuffy and elitist. What we found with people our age who consider themselves into good music is that it’s not the music but the presentation that they find off putting. So we put classical music stuff in gig venues or DIY studio spaces.

Ensemble launches 27 September with a mini-music festival at Block B. Info here. PHOTO: Killian Broderick 




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